Electrics

Our first decision was to use the on-board 24 volt system in the “house”. A second independent alternator was fitted for charging two Lifeline deep cycle “house” batteries exclusively. Joined in series, these 12 volt batteries will produce 24 volts with a total 100 amp capacity for the “house”. Mounted on a sliding tray they’re accessible from the side door for servicing.

The first junction in our electrical layout is a bus bar which transmits power from the the batteries to the fixtures.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Our needs are basic: lights and ventilation fans. Some of our “appliances” don’t have switches and require a distribution panel. The first line from the bus bar goes to this 6-gang distribution panel that has in-line fuses.Distribution Panel

From this panel, using the rocker switches we’ll control two muffin fans and the pre-existing ceiling light/ventilation fan. Bonus – the panel also includes two USB ports, a 12V DC socket and a voltage readout.

Other “appliances” including two LED cabin tube lights, a gimballed cabin fan and a LED goose-neck reading light have built-in switches. From the bus bar, the second line goes to a fuse block. From the fuse block, lines go to each of these “appliances”.

 

InverterCharging 110V appliances such as a camera, laptop and flashlight batteries demanded our electrical layout include a pure sine wave inverter.

The inverter, directly connected to the house batteries is also grounded to the vehicle chassis. This 350 watt inverter won’t handle the load a toaster requires but it’s more than adequately sized to meet our needs.

For safety and to keep wiring tidy, surface conduits are used throughout the “house”.

003.JPG

With a great deal of help from our friend Steve, the electrician we can see light at the end of the tunnel. 

Author: Tulák

Curious – what’s around the next corner? Wandering, searching to find, where do I belong? Between the old and new world. Always looking for an adventure.

4 thoughts on “Electrics”

  1. Are you planning any solar panels? We put two 160 Watt panels on our Mog/Camper. I sleep with a CPAP which draws our single 12V battery well down over night, but by noon we are fully recharged by the solar panels. One of our better ideas, for our particular use.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s